Funny Scottish Wisdom

By | September 6, 2009

 

  • Ye may not sit in Rome and strive with the Pope.
  • When the heart is full the tongue will speak.
  • When the cup is full, carry it even.
  • What may be done at any time will be done at no time.
  • War makes thieves, and peace hangs them.
  • They that sow the wind shall reap the whirlwind.
  • They that smell least smell best.
  • They talk of my drinking but never my thirst.
  • They are good that are away.
  • There’s no medicine for fear.
  • There never was a five-pound note but there was a ten-pound road for it.
  • The Devil’s boots don’t creak.
  • The day has eyes, the night has ears.
  • Take care of your pennies and your dollars will take care of themselves.
  • Penny wise and pound foolish.
  • One whisky is all right; two is too much; three is too few.
  • Never take a wife till you know what to do with her.
  • Never marry for money. You can borrow it cheaper.
  • Never let your feet run faster than your shoes.
  • Money is flat and meant to be piled up.
  • Money is better than my lord’s letter.
  • Married folk are like rats in a trap — fain to get others in, but fain to be out themselves.
  • Luck never gives; it only lends.
  • Learn young, learn fair; learn old, learn more.
  • It’s a sad house where the hen crows louder than the cock.
  • If you don’t see the bottom, don’t wade.
  • If the doctor cures, the sun sees it; if he kills, the earth hides it.
  • He that peeks through a keyhole may see what will vex him.
  • He that marries a widow will have a dead man’s head often thrown in his dish.
  • Get what you can and keep what you have; that’s the way to get rich.
  • Friends are lost by calling often and calling seldom.
  • Every man to his taste, as the man said when he kissed his cow.
  • Either a man or a mouse.
  • Egotism is an alphabet of one letter.
  • Don’t marry for money, you can borrow it cheaper.
  • Don’t be penny wise and pound foolish.
  • Choose your wife with her nightcap on.
  • Better wear out shoes than sheets.
  • Better half hanged than ill married.
  • Better bend than break.
  • Be slow in choosing a friend but slower in changing him.
  • All that’s said in the kitchen should not be told in the hall.
  • A wise lawyer never goes to law himself.
  • A pound o’ care will no pay an ounce of debt.
  • A plump widow needs no advertisement.
  • A penny saved is a penny gained.
  • A man’s best fortune or his worst is a wife.
  • A man cannot wive and thrive the same year.
  • A light purse makes a heavy heart.
  • A liar should have a good memory.
  • A hungry man smells meat far.
  • A house without a dog, a cat, or a little child is a house without joy or laughter.
  • A gloved cat was never a good hunter.
  • A fou purse never lacks friends.
  • A fool may speer questions than a wise man can answer.
  • A fool and his money are soon parted.
  • A close mouth catches nae fleas.
  • A child may have too much of his mother’s blessing.
  • A bad wound may heal, but a bad name will kill.

 

Images from Scotland 2The Scottish people or Scots are a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland. Historically they emerged from an amalgamation of the Picts and Gaels, incorporating neighboring Britons to the south as well as Germanic peoples such as the Anglo-Saxons and the Norse. Later the Normans also had some influence.

In modern use, “Scottish people” or “Scots” is used to refer to anyone whose linguistic, cultural, family ancestral or genetic origins are from within Scotland. The Latin word Scotti originally applied to a particular, 5th century, Goidelic tribe that inhabited Ireland. Though sometimes considered archaic or pejorative, the term Scotch has also been used for the Scottish people, though this usage is current primarily outside Scotland.~ Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_people